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  1. #161
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    I'm finally getting into the Unity thing after a couple of crappy tutorials that obfuscate the issue.

    This tutorial was really good because it is simple and just shows the basic stuff about how to lay things down and connect it up with code to make stuff happen. I don't want to see people clicking a million times to make assets look nice. I want the programming part. This is a really good tutorial to go from not knowing anything to being able to probably figure out just about anything.

  2. #162
    Pull the strings! Architect's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarydoor View Post
    I'm finally getting into the Unity thing after a couple of crappy tutorials that obfuscate the issue.
    Unity is good but suffers from the same problem as all high level inversion of control API's do, which is it's great to get started and it sucks further along. Doesn't stop people from building games on it though, I'm doing same.

  3. #163
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    I wonder what other members here do in this situation:

    for the last 1.5 weeks I've had high motivation, staying back late at work to learn new things. Today it just plummeted. The task I have to do should be easy. But it's just tedious. I think I tend to work in waves of high production, contrasting with low. I like to just work with that, rather than fight against it. But I don't know how acceptable that is.

    A while ago, after some very productive time, my 'mentor' guy at work seemed to think that he should give me some direction. So he told me to do something, and it just really killed all my motivation. I obviously should try to do what he had suggested, but it was against where my current motivation was at that time, and so I was just fighting against things.

    Today, I pretty much just wanted to do nothing. I actually think that is sometimes very good for your brain. I ended up looking up some fairly unrelated programming stuff that was above my level, but just somewhat interesting, but was also a bit paranoid that my 'mentor guy' would look over and ask why I'm not spending every moment of my time doing exactly something for the specific job we're doing. Whereas in reality, I think I know that I need to twist my mental motivation around to that state, rather than try to bludgeon it in -- at least I think that is how it needs to be.

    My job isn't especially technical compared to some programmers (I guess?), but still, I don't think I've really had a job before that is fairly focused on utilising some intellectual thing. In comparison I had a job stacking boxes once, and if you have an uninspired day, you probably can still stack boxes. But how I can say "I just am struggling to be able to think about this tedious problem today"? Perhaps I'll come up with some better strategies over time.

    Also the noise at work is sometimes very inhibiting. If people are talking nearby it really bothers me. I've got some better reasonably noise-cancelling headphones coming -- hoping to be able to create a solitary world-thing with them.

  4. #164
    just dont think about it mhc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarydoor View Post
    I wonder what other members here do in this situation:

    for the last 1.5 weeks I've had high motivation, staying back late at work to learn new things. Today it just plummeted. The task I have to do should be easy. But it's just tedious. I think I tend to work in waves of high production, contrasting with low. I like to just work with that, rather than fight against it. But I don't know how acceptable that is.

    A while ago, after some very productive time, my 'mentor' guy at work seemed to think that he should give me some direction. So he told me to do something, and it just really killed all my motivation. I obviously should try to do what he had suggested, but it was against where my current motivation was at that time, and so I was just fighting against things.

    Today, I pretty much just wanted to do nothing. I actually think that is sometimes very good for your brain. I ended up looking up some fairly unrelated programming stuff that was above my level, but just somewhat interesting, but was also a bit paranoid that my 'mentor guy' would look over and ask why I'm not spending every moment of my time doing exactly something for the specific job we're doing. Whereas in reality, I think I know that I need to twist my mental motivation around to that state, rather than try to bludgeon it in -- at least I think that is how it needs to be.

    My job isn't especially technical compared to some programmers (I guess?), but still, I don't think I've really had a job before that is fairly focused on utilising some intellectual thing. In comparison I had a job stacking boxes once, and if you have an uninspired day, you probably can still stack boxes. But how I can say "I just am struggling to be able to think about this tedious problem today"? Perhaps I'll come up with some better strategies over time.

    Also the noise at work is sometimes very inhibiting. If people are talking nearby it really bothers me. I've got some better reasonably noise-cancelling headphones coming -- hoping to be able to create a solitary world-thing with them.
    you will actually be counter productive by trying to force productivity. fun things art fun if they're 24/7 (tho there are still some things that ide have a crack at to try and disprove that ) if you find yourself getting bored do something that you like. then when your good at that try and meld those things you like back to your work and let the productivity naturally flow back
    Just look at the blue sky

  5. #165
    schlemiel Faust's Avatar
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    @scarydoor, I get boom-and-bust motivation as well for side projects. Firmly on the bust side of things when I don't sleep well. The idea for me is to create a web map application using the esri javascript api and asp.net. Not because I want to, but to help future job prospects.
    "All my heroes are dead" - John Zorn

    "It's not selfish if you hate yourself"

  6. #166
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    I've been a bit concerned that my position at my company is not secure. I've not really been doing anything very productive. It's not really my fault. The specifications are extremely vague. My coworker says the same thing.

    For a month we were going to make a thing in a CMS. I learnt the CMS and using it to do the thing made no sense. I told my boss that, and he said "just try a bit harder. I'm sure it's possible.", so I did it, and it was possible, but was a stupid way to do it. Before christmas he said "we'll make it in Ionic because the CMS thing doesn't make sense." I'd learnt Ionic a little bit. Then me and the other front end guy said Ionic makes no sense, because we don't need all the extra shit it gives you. It's just a website. So we said we'd just make it in Angular, because Ionic is built on top of Angular, so why not. So I learnt Angular in a basic way and we made it in that. Then we are asking what this app/website needs to actually do, and we're told "generally... blah blah blah... [I don't know]", and we're told to make an app/website with some vague guidelines. So we did. And I'm asked to make it look better somehow. "Do the UX, and design this thing that has no specification". And I'm like "wtf... okay let me learn UX and design principles...". This is because my job interview was about how I can hack CSS to replicate sites or something, but I've stopped doing that, and UX/design is kind of different. Then my mentor said "can you learn identityserver4 and make all that work." so I spent a few days on that, plus integration with Angular, plus some other random thing, and probably need a couple weeks to learn this. And I'm asked when will the chat bot integration be added to this app. "also we need you to add front-end testing, unit testing, etc". So I learn this on top of Angular that I've just learnt. "and the support guys are a bit busy, so can you learn some of the back end / deployment stuff too". These things are all achievable, but directions are very vague, and people always tell me to start something else. And it takes some time.

    And I ask "why do we want a chatbot?" (literally this: ) "the customer wants the bot to ask a yes/no question at the end" "okay, so... we could have a form button that does that...". No, it will be a chatbot. So, rather than a yes/no button, we will hook up to some chatbot to do NLP to determine if the person has said yes/no, and probably charge them a monthly cost for the subscription to whatever hosts that AI stuff, to do that. So stupid. I had an idea to write a javascript function that pretends to be a chatbot. E.g. maybe a regex, scans for all variations of yes/no/yeah/nah/etc, and program in a random error. Hard-coded, 6% of the time the response is "I don't understand. Can you repeat that?" Virtually the same. Maybe that is the turing test for whether something is a chatbot or not a chatbot.

    So basically I haven't produced much tangible stuff, because I've been busy learning stuff, and that kind of worries me.

    On Monday it was said that we are advertising for two new positions for our team. Boss is nervous when telling us this. I see right through all that body-language. A month ago they said the team is full. The positions are for exactly what my boss wanted me to do with the design etc. So I am nervous.

    When I was a teacher I got fired twice because I was bad at that job, so it taught me to expect that. I can smell it. Or at least, I know that I'm not providing any value. (but also that's because no one has properly told us what they want us to do)

    But I believe they won't just fire me. In the time I've been here I've learnt a bunch of new technology thingos that are pretty difficult. Our company needs 4-6 'certified developers' in the CMS we use. 3/14 of us passed, and I came fourth, just 2% from the pass, with a retake coming up. They've invested some time in me, learning some technologies the company uses, so that probably means I have value, and apparently I'm as capable as the other developers they already have. I haven't achieved much because no one's organising this thing properly. So, I won't get fired?

    So I'm predicting that tomorrow or the next day my boss will say he wants me to work for the other team, at least for a while. Probably will be like "we don't really have enough work. Also their team leader is away. And they tried to hire developers and can't find anyone good". Today, as he was leaving, that other boss said to me, jovially "hey have you reached epic level .NET yet?" (or some paraphrased thing). I laughed and said "haha, almost [shrug]. ...Why do you ask?" and he looked awkward and said "there's no problem. don't worry" He's avoiding saying something (maybe I'm just super paranoid). He was talking to my boss earlier too. Earlier in the day I'd asked my boss where the new people will sit. Our area is full (essentially the situation doesn't make sense). He joked that we'll have to share computers. Evasive. I feel like I can read straight through this.

    My team is sort of full of immature people. My boss hasn't really been given proper work, and creates random tasks for us to do. The girl doesn't know what Math.Floor does and is convinced I don't know how to programme, and she just hacks random shit together relentlessly. The two guys bitch about how they hate their friend, and whisper gossip to each other. It feels really a bit stressful working there. I've been spending my time just trying to learn the new technologies, vaguely, until someone gives us something proper to do. The other team actually is given work, and completes it. I think it's maybe a little bit boring work. But they actually do things. My mentor didn't seem to know the difference between Node.js and Angular. There are some cool people in that team who aren't whiny bitches.

    I'm also thinking that if I were to be fired, I should go directly to Sydney/Melbourne, or, if I can afford, just shoot over to Europe and start things going there. Also hope I can get more productive. I am great at learning new stuff. But not as good at applying it.

  7. #167
    New Member Autumn's Avatar
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    It's 2018 now. Can't we just... finally admit that wpf/xaml simply sucks?
    Every time I have to work with it again after some break, I somehow always end up googling for phrases like "wpf sucks", "i hate wpf", etc. but all I ever find is this bullshitting about how the learning curve is so steep but once you get it it gets super productive... Well I doubt it. Every time I step out of its "comfort zone" I'm just left there wondering why it doesn't work. I can't even debug because it's magic. I need to spend hours and hours traversing the net, scavenging for bits of code that either end up whispering the appropriate spell or not. Especially if I could hack something up in code-behind, something that actually works, but no, code-behind is evil (I mean yeah, it's code after all, so god forbid some code-illiterate a**holes need to try and comprehend some code, omg!) so let's just stick with MVVM because, well, because.

    Either I'm stupid for being unable to accept the greatness of MVVM, or someday people will finally realize that it was indeed bad. Meh... for now, it's just meh...

  8. #168
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    @pensive_pilgrim
    "Wow. And here I sit thinking I'm not quite qualified to be a programmer"

    You'd probably be very qualified. Probably most intps would be too, if they take some programming seriously for a little while.

    (you just need to identify some specific areas / skills that are valuable to employers that you also want to do, then focus on those for a while until you can do them a little bit, and then you get a job, and then you pick up whatever else you need as time goes on)

    I thought the same thing before I got into it. Thinking that everyone would generally be intp-ish like me (sort of), but more so, and better. "I'm not good enough". Very strangely, I seem to find that's not quite the case.

    The guy who is 'mentoring' me seems to be a bit of a istp, maybe. I notice that I think he often doesn't quite understand the bigger picture of what he's doing. He often seems to race through some tutorials or directions he found on the internet, which makes him look really busy, because he's rapidly following instructions (blindly), but meanwhile (if he's applying this 'help' to my code) I'm thinking "oh my god, stop for a moment and think and figure out what this is even meant to be doing!!".

    A while ago, I briefly asked him if he could tell me the name they use for servers on Azure cloud (like because these 'cloud providers' like to use stupid confusing names for basic things). I wanted to throw up an angular 'app' I'd put together, just to test how it looked from a device (that means 'smart phone') not on the local network. I wanted a basic server. I ask what he suggests. "oh you'll want a node server" [because angular is built with javascript]. No. Angular is a static site by default. No server side (node) javascript is required!! I said "... no... I don't need node... I mean just like a basic server...". In the end, obviously I just wanted like apache, or iis, right. You know, something that just works. A few weeks later I noticed he'd added that to his pool of knowledge, specifically mentioning how angular is just static, etc...

    A few days ago I'd followed a little guide on making an API in aws or something. Afterwards he suggested I then adapt it for the other thing. "change the variable names and see what breaks until it works for our thing". Oh god. I sort of intimated that I'd rather just see how it works and then change it where it needs to be changed, or just rewrite it, because it's small anyway. But the approach is "hack bits away and see if it seems to still work, and then sort of assume that it does."

    etc.

    He's a good programmer etc. But sometimes it's disconcerting that decisions are made without really understanding what the things are for. Sometimes our code just has random fragments in it.

    It seems as though being "sort of intp" is actually a little bit rare. I would really recommend this job, I think. One thing I might be struggling with is that I don't really like to get stuff done. I prefer to look into things / think about things / get a general idea. But if my boss says "make the interface look really good" that makes my productivity drop to near zero. I start to think about the best way to organise interfaces so that we can switch things around in some kind of idealised perfect way. But I will never get there. Got to change this. Maybe just make myself throw together 40 interfaces rapidly or something, so I no longer need to think about the mundane details, and it just happens.

    But besides that my job is to constantly learn new things. It's great. Also web programming is excellent. I've been thinking about this. The technologies change often (JS frameworks, etc, 'cloud' stuff, etc), but the underlying stuff is basically constant (browsers that can read a few file types, http protocols, servers that do stuff, databases, security protocols (etc) ), and I think you can start to see these new technologies as just new ways of using the old stuff, to make a slight improvement in some way, and you can take it or leave it. In this way you build up a conceptual model of this big complex beast, gradually overturning new bits of understanding. It's fun. And seeing these wacky new approaches that get developed is sort of fun too. Random little things. But fun things. Custom web html components made from native javascript. All that transpiling stuff. Funny frameworks that make aws deployment stuff happen easier.

  9. #169
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    my probation ends in a month. i had a check-in with my boss. He says so long as I don't piss him off before then, it's all good. I think I'm becoming a really real developer. hurray.
    web development is fun. We've been doing aws stuff. A framework called serverless takes a simple configuration file, your aws credentials, and sends everything up there. It's pretty easy. Getting the hang of this 'cloud' stuff. (I think one of my main reservations is the idea of navigating GUIs in order to do programming, but if you use some kind of cli based deployment like this 'serverless' framework, then that is overcome)

    I used Docker to make a local (sort of) 'environment' that is like aws, with a separate container for dynamoDB. I had to make a virtual network inside docker, with two containers for those two things, because that's how it works. Then you can deploy to one or the other, and spam the endpoints of the local one with your http calls.

    I had a problem the other day where the other team's api was not letting me get stuff because of 'same origin' stuff (etc) not being in the returned headers. So I tried to make this local proxy thing that it gets sent through to add those headers on just before it gets back to me. Then I realised I had to send that through the work proxy too, because node, by default, assumes a direct connection to the internet. It is fun. I like how there are so many different things going on with web programming.

    the program Postman is very good, and does a lot more than just make http calls. The testing features are great.

    i had forgotten, or never knew, properly how callbacks work in javascript. I re-learned that, in order to retrieve data from http calls, with their asynchronous nature.

    I've been watching some videos on functional programming with javascript. I might be almost sold. The principle of making sure your functions are 'pure' is very compelling. I imagine that would be great for unit testing, which I've still not quite done.

    Today my boss told me that he has observed that I like to do my programming in a well composed manner. As in, loosely coupled, and all of that. Whereas some others on the team are more chaotic, and have a 'it's good enough' approach. I guess I agree. It does fairly severely piss me off when code exists that is written in a terrible way. Or copy-pasted from somewhere, with unnecessary remnants that just confuse the whole mess. So he's handing some other things over to me to get properly working.

    I may have said this already. The website pluralsight is, in my opinion, by far the ultimate site for self learning programming videos. I don't think I've ever had a course that was bad. I think it's something like $255/year, if you don't have a workplace to pay for it. I would say, if this learning style works for you, it is definitely worth it, as after a year of these courses, you've probably increased your earning potential fairly considerably.

  10. #170
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Anyone have experience with Movidius Neural Compute Sticks? Catchy name aside, they look like they might be able to do some interesting tricks.
    Every master plan has one overarching contingency that will be required for success: desenrascanço. In light of this, it is tempting to skip the planning phase and just make desenrascanço your master plan. I don't recommend this, but it has worked out for me in the past to an alarming degree. The problem is it keeps you too focused on the short term to ever improve your situation in the long.
    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

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